12 Questions To Exponential Knowledge

Everyone knows more than you. You possess pockets of knowledge that excel others. But, when you think you know, assume you don’t.

assume you don't know

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Even when you know the “most,” many know more.

Knowledge and questions:

The opportunity of knowing is “not knowing,” effectively.

Few things surpass the beauty of questions from someone with knowledge. You learn the most about others by the questions they ask, not the statements they make.

Use what you know to know more. Even ignorance can ask questions.

7 ways to gain knowledge:

  1. Argue to apply. Theories are wonderful. Application brings them to life.
  2. Challenge to prove right.
  3. Go with not against.
  4. Explore for clarification not to devalue. It’s easy to shut others down and learn nothing.
  5. Understand purpose before discounting ideas. Knowledge seeks the reason behind reasons and ideas.
  6. Bring context to discussions. How might supervisors view this, for example.
  7. Pursue clarity until action emerges.

Action creates it’s own clarity.

12 questions toward exponential knowledge:

  1. How has this impacted your life or leadership?
  2. How did you come to these ideas?
  3. How could others put these ideas into practice?
  4. What difference does it make?
  5. Why does it matter?
  6. What are you trying to accomplish?
  7. What does this mean to the people it affects?
  8. Who benefits? Why? How?
  9. What happens if you try?
  10. What happens if you don’t try?
  11. What if you fail?
  12. What if you succeed?

How can leaders grow their knowledge, especially when they think they know?