How to Persevere Without Destroying Yourself

I’ve been the victim of bad grit. You have too. We’ve put our heads down, closed our minds, and plowed forward. In the process we hurt ourselves and others.

Bad grit is one reason last year’s frustrations persist.

 growth requires new ways of seeing

Extraordinary leaders possess good G.R.I.T.

Grit: Your capacity to dig deep, to do whatever it takes – especially struggle, sacrifice, even suffer – to achieve your most worthy goals. (Paul G. Stoltz, Ph.D. in GRIT)

Good and bad:

Paul Stoltz says, “Good grit is the relentless pursuing of things that are ultimately beneficial to you and (ideally) others. Bad grit is the opposite.”

Four dimensions of GRIT*:

#1. Growth:

Your propensity to seek and consider new ideas, additional alternatives, different approaches, and fresh perspectives.

#2. Resilience:

Your capacity to respond constructively and ideally make good use of all kinds of adversity.

#3. Instinct:

Your gut-level capacity to pursue the right goals in the best and smartest ways.

#4. Tenacity:

The degree to which you persist, commit to, stick with, and relentlessly go after whatever you choose to achieve.

Good grit and growth:

Bad grit presses forward, grits its teeth, and closes down. Good grit presses forward, grits its teeth, and opens up.

Bad grit knows. Good grit learns.

Persistence destroys those who refuse to learn and adapt.

Finding good grit through growth:

Growth is what helps you get unstuck. Paul Stoltz, Ph.D.

Growth questions:

  1. What prevents me from trying a new approach?
  2. Who can I learn from?
  3. What is adversity teaching me about myself?
  4. What am I doing about recurring frustration or disappointment?
  5. What awkward idea or strategy, that others have employed, might I adapt to my situation?

What is the difference between good grit and bad grit?

What does a leader with good grit look like?

*This post is based on the book, “GRIT: The new science of what it takes to persever, flourish, succeed,” by Paul G. Stoltz, Ph.D. (Highly recommended)

Follow Paul on twitter: @DrGrit