I’m Afraid I’ll Be Alone

I asked a group about their fears. She said, “I’m afraid I’ll be alone.” It was years ago, but I still admire her courage.

She wasn’t afraid of alone-time. Mature leaders want, even need, solitude. But feeling on the outside is painful isolation. 

Successful leaders create opportunities to build belonging.

the one with the most status has the opportunity to move first.png

Leadership as partnership:

Kingdom building is an act of destructive isolation. 

“Bossing” requires and establishes disconnection.

The heart longs for partnership. Vitality requires it. Vibrancy is building connections and breaking silos.

Principles of partnership:

  1. Partnership requires participation. Partners grab an oar, while bosses stand aloof.
  2. Partners receive and give value. Bosses take. Today’s goal: focus more on giving value and less on receiving.
  3. Partners don’t act independently. Independence violates partnership.
  4. Partners care. Wouldn’t it be great if the people on your team believed you cared about them? How can you communicate that you care today?
    • Interest expresses care.
    • Open listening indicates care.
    • Shared goals ignite care. Do you know your teammates’ goals?
  5. Partners fail together. What you do when people fail, reveals your character and partnership.
  6. Partners serve each other. Take care of your team so your team can serve others.
  7. Partners trust each other. Leaders move first when it comes to trust.

Connection ignites vitality but death is enduring disconnection.

Practice partnership:

The one with the most status has the opportunity to move first. Don’t wait for people to partner with you. Partner with them.

Get on their team before asking them to get on yours.

  1. What are your big goals?
  2. How might we help each other?
  3. How will we find and follow fulfillment at work?
  4. I think I know someone who could be helpful to you.

How does “partnership” impact your thinking about leadership?

How might leaders build and strengthen partnerships in organizations.